News | Announcements

Nov. 8th Women in Energy: Navigating and Leading in the Energy Field (Panel Discussion and Reception)

 

The Rutgers Energy Institute and Columbia University's Center on Global Energy Policy are excited to announce the first Women in Energy event being held at Rutgers University. Please join us for a panel conversation focused on female leadership in the energy sector. Panelists will share their experiences, career paths, and offer advice for students seeking to enter the energy/environment field. This is a public event open to all and will be followed by a small reception. 

Rutgers University Busch Student Center - The Cove, 604 Bartholomew Road  Piscataway, NJ 08854

Wednesday, November 8, 2017 6:00pm to 8:00pm ET

Parking: Visitors may park in Lots 51, 59, 60B & 67 without permits. Special event parking is only for visitors to the University and does not include free metered parking. Faculty, Staff, and Students must park only in lots they are authorized to park in.

Our panel of experts will include:

  • Serpil Guran, Director of Rutgers EcoComplex “Clean Energy Innovation Center”  
  • Jeanne Fox, Adjunct Professor in School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University; former Commissioner at New Jersey Board of Public Utilities; former Regional Administrator at U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 2; former Commissioner at New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy
  • Alissa Park, Lenfest Chair in Applied Climate Science and Director of The Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy at Columbia University 
  • Ellen Morris, Adjunct Professor in School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University and President and Founder of Sustainable Energy Solutions
  • Rachael Shwom, Associate Professor in Department of Human Ecology at Rutgers University; Associate Director of The Rutgers Energy Institute (moderator)

About the Women in Energy Program: The WIE program is aimed at increasing the presence of women in the energy sector, and over the mid to long term, the presence of women in senior and management roles across the energy space through a (1) variety of public outreach, networking and community building activities, (2) leadership training and mentorship, and (3) facilitating opportunities for paid internships and full-time career opportunities.The program seeks to empower students to take on leadership roles in the energy sector and realize their full potential, while building a thriving community of professional women. 

Event is Free but

Registration will be required - Click Here

Press Contact: Jamie Shellenberger-Bessmann (jas2453@sipa.columbia.edu). For more information contact: energypolicy@columbia.edumjem2245@sipa.columbia.edu, or bea@marine.rutgers.edu

Scott Glenn named a Fellow of the Marine Technology Society

Scott Glenn, distinguished professor in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences and co-director of the Center for Ocean Observing Leadership, has been named a Fellow of the Marine Technology Society. This honor recognizes his career of developing novel technologies that have been used to forecast the Gulf Stream dynamics, developing integrated ocean observatories, improving the ability to sample and forecast hurricane intensity, and his focus on integrating undergraduate education into his research. Read more. Learn more about Dr. Glenn's work.

Climate-Change and Clean-Energy To-Do List for NJ

More than two dozen state leaders have prepared a plan to help the next administration get right to work cleaning up New Jersey's environment... New Jersey's Global Warming Response Act requires the state to reduce carbon pollution to 1990 levels by 80 percent by 2050, a target that many say will be difficult to achieve. Last week, the Rutgers Climate Institute said the state must reduce emissions by 76 percent from today's levels to achieve the 2050 target.

Center for Energy, Economic & Environmental Policy offering professional development courses on energy, electricity markets

The Center for Energy, Economic & Environmental Policy at the Bloustein School is offering professional development courses for those interested in learning more about electricity markets, the electric power industry, and energy efficiency.

  • Two-Day Course: In-depth Introduction to Electricity Markets October 24-25, 2017
  • Workshop: Renewable Energy and Markets October 26, 2017
  • Learn more by clicking here

 

Report Outlines Pathways to Greenhouse Gas Cuts in New Jersey

 

New Jersey has met its near-term requirement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, but reaching its 2050 goal will require much deeper reductions to meet this goal, according to a report released by researchers at the Rutgers Climate Institute and Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University-New Brunswick.

The 2007 New Jersey Global Warming Response Act required an 80 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 from 2006 levels, or about 75 percent lower than today. Significant new policies and enhancements of current strategies will be needed to achieve such a dramatic reduction, but no new legislation is necessary, the report says.

The report, An Examination of Policy Options for Achieving Greenhouse Gas Emissions, examines the status of New Jersey’s greenhouse gas emissions; the policies needed to achieve the reductions required by the 2007 law; and innovative efforts in other states that might benefit New Jersey. It is a collaboration of researchers from the Rutgers Climate Institute, Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Georgetown Climate Center and World Resources Institute.

The New Jersey Global Warming Response Act set statewide legal limits on greenhouse gas emissions such as carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide. The report, among other findings, concludes that the state’s limits continue to represent the latest science, including the science underlying the 2015 international Paris Agreement ratified by 160 parties so far.

“The good news in New Jersey is that there’s a lot of existing authority and programs to advance the sort of climate action we need to meet the 2050 limits,” said Jeanne Herb, associate director of the Environmental Analysis and Communications Group at Rutgers-New Brunswick’s Bloustein School and one of the report’s authors. “We don’t need new legislation to make a significant impact.”

The authors also stress the health and economic benefits linked to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, including cleaner air, technological innovation and job creation.

“Our examination of programs in states such as California, Colorado, and Washington – as well as New Jersey – shows that science-based climate policy can deliver a wide range of public benefits that go well beyond reducing greenhouse gas emissions,” said report co-author Marjorie Kaplan, associate director of the Rutgers Climate Institute. “This is also an opportunity to address the needs of vulnerable populations – people with existing medical conditions, the elderly, the disabled, those with limited access to healthcare – and the low-income and minority communities that historically bear a disproportionate burden with respect to environmental contaminants.”

The report suggests pursuing three main “pathways to decarbonization” consistent with the 2015 Paris Agreement: (1) transitioning to a low-carbon energy system; (2) sequestering carbon through forests, soils and carbon dioxide removal technologies; and (3) reducing non-carbondioxide emissions such as methane, nitrous oxide and hydrofluorocarbon emissions in other sectors of the economy, including transportation.

The report notes that transportation is the largest source of emissions in New Jersey, accounting for 44.2 percent, followed by electricity generation (20 percent) and fossil fuels used in the residential (11.6 percent), industrial (9.8 percent) and commercial (9.7 percent) sectors, mainly for heating. For the transportation sector, the report identifies policy options that involve increasing the efficiency of vehicles, switching to fuels that are less carbon-intensive and reducing vehicle miles traveled through mass transit, smart growth and other policies. Read more.

The report and additional information can be accessed at climatechange.rutgers.edu  and the link below:

An Examination of Policy Options for Achieving Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions in New Jersey - September 2017