News | Announcements

EERE Building Technologies Office (BTO) post-doctoral positions

Building Technologies Office in EERE has two open positions for post-doctoral fellows, one focused on HVAC&R technology R&D and one focused on R&D for grid-interactive efficient buildings.

1. Building Technologies Office Post-Doctoral Opportunity in Grid-Interactive Efficient BuildingsBuilding Technologies Office Post-Doctoral Opportunity in Grid-Interactive Efficient Buildings - DOE-EERE-STP-BTO-2018-1203

2. Building Technologies Office Opportunity in HVAC, Water Heating and Appliances - DOE-EERE-STP-BTO-2018-1202

ARPA-E Duration Addition to Electricity Storage (DAYS) FOA

Advanced Research Projects Agency- Energy is now soliciting funding proposals for its Duration Addition to Electricity Storage (DAYS) program to improve the stationary electricity storage systems incorporated into the larger electricity grid.

  • Notice of intent deadline June 15, 2018 and full application deadline July 2, 2018.
  • Learn more

Department of Energy Announces $34 Million for Innovation Building Technologies Research and Development

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced up to $34.5 million in funding to support building technology research and development (R&D). Buildings are the single largest energy-consuming sector in the U.S. economy, representing approximately 75% of the nation’s electricity use and 40% of its total energy demand, resulting in Americans spending nearly $400 billion each year to power homes, offices, schools, hospitals, and other commercial and residential buildings.

The Energy Department’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) is issuing two funding opportunities: Buildings Energy Efficiency Frontiers & Innovation Technologies (BENEFIT) 2018 and Solid-State Lighting Research. These funding announcements will further the Administration’s goal to drive U.S. technology leadership in solid-state lighting as well as develop innovative energy saving technologies, systems, tools, and models that could lead to significant reduction in building energy consumption by supporting innovative research in several topic areas.

BENEFIT 2018 will fund up to $19.5 million for approximately 15-25 cost-shared projects focused on early-stage R&D to enable the development of novel technologies that can improve efficiency, reduce the energy costs of the nation’s buildings, and facilitate interaction with the electricity grid. Read more. 

George Tsilomelekis receives NSF Early Career Faculty Award

George Tsilomelekis, of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, was awarded $500,000 for research on developing more energy-efficient production of propylene, which is used in creating many materials. The research will develop novel catalysts with dual functionality for converting propane to propylene. Tsilomelekis’ uses spectroscopic techniques under real reaction conditions in seeking new paths to efficient, renewable and alternative energy sources. The award also will fund outreach for younger students through development of a freeware computer game that teaches principles of molecular symmetry and spectroscopy. A native of Greece, Tsilomelekis came to Rutgers in 2015. Read more. 

Solar-Powered Sea Slugs Shed Light on Search for Perpetual Green Energy

In an amazing achievement akin to adding solar panels to your body, a northeast sea slug sucks raw materials from algae to provide its lifetime supply of solar-powered energy, according to a study by Rutgers University–New Brunswick and other scientists.

“It’s a remarkable feat because it’s highly unusual for an animal to behave like a plant and survive solely on photosynthesis,” said Debashish Bhattacharya, senior author of the study and distinguished professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology at Rutgers–New Brunswick. “The broader implication is in the field of artificial photosynthesis. That is, if we can figure out how the slug maintains stolen, isolated plastids to fix carbon without the plant nucleus, then maybe we can also harness isolated plastids for eternity as green machines to create bioproducts or energy. The existing paradigm is that to make green energy, we need the plant or alga to run the photosynthetic organelle, but the slug shows us that this does not have to be the case.” Read more