News and Announcements

Georgios Tsilomelekis- assistant professor, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, School of Engineering, is the principal investigator of an award totaling $292,193. The project, titled Elucidating Solvent Effects in Biomass Conversion Reactions by Means of Operando Spectroscopy, is being supported by the National Science Foundation. Learn more about Tsilomelekis here.

Richard Riman, distinguished professor, Rutgers University, of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering is one of this year's HIVE 50 Honorees in the Building Technology category. The HIVE 50 are drawn from the top people, products and processes that are leading the charge to inspire creativity, higher performance, and innovation in housing. Honorees are separated into five categories – building technology, capital, design, intel and strategy. Read more...

The latest Annual Report published by the Office of Research and Economic Development highlighting Rutgers research achievements for Fiscal Year 2017 is now available to view and download. Read more...

The newly formed Honors College at Rutgers University was envisioned as “a living-learning community focused on tackling complex problems and global challenges.” Four students and their faculty advisors just put that theory into practice. Honors College students Yuki Osumi ('20/School of Arts and Sciences), Sarah Pomeranz ('20/Rutgers Business School), and Anurag Modak ('20/SAS), with Ari Mendelow (‘18/School of Engineering) won the Hult Prize at Rutgers University Competition on December 8. Johnson & Johnson, one of the sponsors of the competition donated the $1,000 first prize.

Rutgers Business School student Sarah Pomeranz said that she and the team were ecstatic over the win, and very grateful to their advisors. “We had a Board of Advisors comprised of Rutgers faculty and professionals spanning the campus; we learned so much from them and our experiences in the Rutgers Eco Complex and the Innovation Lab .”

SULIS (solar ultraviolet light-induced sterilization) is a solar powered water purification system for communities without access to clean water, whether they are in developing countries or recovering from natural disasters. The team’s research shows that using ultraviolet light the technology could sterilize 12 liters of water in seven hours.  Read more....

Making fuel from plants has long been a goal of scientists and engineers hoping to limit wild swings in fuel prices and availability and to prepare for a time when fi nite supplies of petroleum dry up.But the promise of obtaining abundant and sus-tainable supplies of liquid fuel from biomass, by and large agricultural crops, is a challenge that still vexes scientists and engineers after decades of research.

Rutgers School of Engineering assistant professor Shishir Chundawat...Read more.

Assistant Professor - Atmospheric Chemistry

Rutgers University–New Brunswick, New Jersey

Applications will be begin to be reviewed January 31, 2018

The Department of Environmental Sciences (http://envsci.rutgers.edu) at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the area of Atmospheric Chemistry. The successful candidate should have a Ph.D. in atmospheric chemistry, chemical engineering, or a related environmental discipline and demonstrated ability to conduct research in a university setting; teach at the graduate and undergraduate levels in atmospheric chemistry or other courses relevant to research interests; and mentor students. We seek applicants with research interests in areas including, but not limited to, interactions between climate change and air quality, and the role of atmospheric chemistry in biogeochemical cycles. We especially encourage applicants who desire to develop interdisciplinary projects and to collaborate with faculty from other programs and departments at Rutgers, including Earth and Planetary Sciences, Ecology and Evolution, Geography, Marine and Coastal Sciences, Biochemistry and Microbiology, the School of Engineering, and the Rutgers Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute. The successful applicant will be eligible for membership in the Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, which unites faculty, researchers, and graduate students studying Earth's interior, continents, oceans, atmosphere, and biosphere, their interactions through Earth history, and their effects on human civilization today. Applicants will be expected to develop a strong, externally-funded research program and to contribute to the Department's education and research missions at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

The facilities of the Department of Environmental Sciences include local and remote supercomputing and an array of state-of-the-art laboratory instrumentation. As a member of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, we have access to the computing and research facilities of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Locally, our Photochemical Assessment Monitoring (PAM) Site (http://pamsite.rutgers.edu/) supports continuous, real-time measurements of various physical and chemical properties of the lower boundary layer, including surface energy fluxes. Through the PAM Site, the department has a strong working relationship with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s Division of Air Quality, which controls over 100 air monitors at 33 different field sites throughout the state. A member of the Big Ten and the Association of American Universities, Rutgers-New Brunswick is America’s eighth oldest institution of higher learning and New Jersey’s premier public research university. The city of New Brunswick sits in the center of America’s vibrant northeast corridor, which runs from Boston to Washington, D.C. We are close to NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory in Princeton and NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, NY, and our faculty members collaborate with scientists at both. We host one of the most diverse student bodies in the United States. As our 2016 commencement speaker President Barack Obama said, “America converges here.”

Qualified applicants should apply at http://jobs.rutgers.edu/postings/53675 with a cover letter, curriculum vitae, statements of research and teaching interests, and the names and contact information for three references. Review of applications will begin January 31, 2018, with an intended start date of September 1, 2018. Applicants from underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply. Questions may be addressed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Rutgers University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Qualified applicants will be considered for employment regardless of race, creed, color, national origin, age, ancestry, nationality, marital or domestic partnership or civil union status, sex, pregnancy, gender identity or expression, disability status, liability for military service, protected veteran status, affectional or sexual orientation, genetic information, or any other category protected by law. As an institution, we value diversity of background and opinion, and prohibit discrimination or harassment on the basis of any legally protected class in the areas of hiring, recruitment, promotion, transfer, demotion, training, compensation, pay, fringe benefits, layoff, termination or any other terms and conditions of employment. For additional information please see the Non-Discrimination Statement at the following web address: http://uhr.rutgers.edu/non-discrimination-statement

This report was prepared by Rutgers University in consultation with the New Jersey Climate Change and Public Health Working Group of the New Jersey Climate Adaptation Alliance. A draft version of this report was issued in February 2017.  The Alliance received public comments on the draft report and made revisions to address the comments in this final version.

The Consulate General of Canada (CGC) in New York, which includes New Jersey as part of its territory, reached out to the Rutgers Energy Institute for participants in an oil sands tour. Oil sands is a naturally occurring mixture of sand, clay or other minerals, water and bitumen.

The CGC, which is responsible for energy- and climate-related advocacy, organized the tour to Alberta for a group of energy experts drawn from academia, think tanks and sector organizations from within the Consulate General’s territory.

Representing the Rutgers Energy Institute (REI) was Nirav Patel, research scholar and director of experiential learning at Rutgers Honors College, who sat down for a Q&A following the four-day tour to Alberta.

Why did you go on the tour? Patel: I study the role of energy education on fostering environmental behavior. The trip was a significant opportunity to discern the facts from myths and misunderstandings that are often reported in popular press on energy production and specifically as it relates to Oil Sands of Alberta. Secondly, given that the trip was being organized by the public policy arm of the Consulate General of Canada in New York, I was representing Rutgers Energy Institute’s mission to offer policy advice to government, business, and civic leaders on energy...

 

The Rutgers Energy Institute and Columbia University’s Center on Global Energy Policy partnered for the first Women in Energy program at Rutgers University on November 8. The goal of the program is to empower students to take on leadership roles in the energy sector and realize their full potential, while building a thriving community of professional women. 

The program, which centered on a moderated panel discussion and open question and answer period featuring the all-female leadership drawn from the energy sector, can be viewed here.  The panel of experts included Serpil Guran, director of Rutgers EcoComplex, the “Clean Energy Innovation Center” at the university; Alissa Park, Lenfest Chair in Applied Climate Science and director of The Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy at Columbia University; Ellen Morris, adjunct professor in the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University and president and founder of Sustainable Energy Solutions; Jeanne Fox, member of Rutgers Board of Trustees and an adjunct professor in School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. Fox is also a former commissioner at the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities as well as the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy. Rounding out the panel, as moderator, was Rachael Shwom, associate professor in the Department of Human Ecology at Rutgers and associate director of the Rutgers Energy Institute.

Panelists shared their experiences and career paths and offered advice for students seeking to enter the energy and environment field.

Ashley Pennington, a Ph.D. candidate at Rutgers...

Read More...

 

The Rutgers Energy Institute expressed sincere gratitude to Columbia University’s Center on Global Energy Policy for their partnership and generous support of the panel discussion and the networking reception. The events moderated panel discussion and open question and answer period can be viewed at https://youtu.be/e3K8Hx4csjo or the video above.

 

TechAdvance, an early-stage technology development fund, provides grants of up to $100,000 to advance Rutgers research projects toward commercialization. Recently, Rutgers inventors G. Charles Dismukes; Martha Greenblatt; Anders Laursen; Karin Calvinho were awarded for their project "A New Catalyst for Generation of Carbon Feedstocks & Fuels from Carbon Dioxide".

Summary: This project focuses on transition metal phosphide catalysts used to selectively generate valuable hydrocarbons for fuel or chemical feedstocks for production from CO2. Using renewable electricity for power, the process can be fully sustainable and a carbon neutral technology.

Market Applications:

  • Renewable feedstocks and fuels
  • Methane and ethylene production for the chemical industry
  • CO2 gas to solids via polymeric [CH2O]n (3>n>100), CO2 emissions recycling/mitigation, electrical energy storage;

Download: Technology Details (pdf)

Learn more about TechAdvance Fund - click here

Q&A with Rutgers Professor Robert E. Kopp, coauthor of “the most up-to-date comprehensive report on climate science on the planet”

The Climate Science Special Report, released last week by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, details the science behind global warming and its current and potential impacts on the American economy, communities, public health and infrastructure.

One of the report’s lead authors is Robert E. Kopp, a professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, director of Rutgers’ Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences and codirector of Rutgers’ Coastal Climate Risk and Resilience Initiative.

Rutgers Today asked Kopp to discuss the report, which serves as Volume 1 of the U.S.’s Fourth National Climate Assessment, and what it says about the future of our planet. Read more Rutgers Today article - click here.

By Dave D'Alessandro

The most comprehensive climate science report in the world was released last Friday, and not surprisingly, it is filled with omens and portents dire.

The National Climate Assessment, an 18-month process involving 51 scientists and 13 federal agencies, found that human influence is the "dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century," and that only a significant reduction in emissions will curtail rising temperatures.

That isn't a surprise to anyone who has been paying attention, but to understand the report's nuances, we turned to a world-class climate scientist.

Robert Kopp, the climate policy scholar at Rutgers' Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences and the director at the Institute of Earth, Ocean and & Atmospheric Studies, has done groundbreaking research on the impact of intensified coastal flooding. His comments below were edited for brevity.

Q. Let's start with the parochial: What does the report say about New Jersey, long considered a sea-level hot spot?

Click here to read entire Star-Ledger article and learn more.

View YouTube interview with Bob Kopp by NJTV.

2018 CHALLENGE: HARNESSING THE POWER OF ENERGY

Energy is the lifeline of humanity. Can you build scalabe, sustainable social enteprises that harness the power of energy to transform the lives of 10million people by 2025 ?

The Hult Prize Foundation is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to bringing together the world’s next wave of social entrepreneurs.

Hult Prize at Rutgers Pitch Competition

December 8th at Rutgers University, New Brunswick

Challenge: “Transform: Harnessing the Power of Energy to Transform Lives

Register for the event at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2017-hult-prize-pitch-competition-tickets-40172005550

Student teams (undergraduate, graduate) will advance directly to regionals if they win

Learn more at:

 

Seeking a better way to capture radioactive iodides in spent nuclear reactor fuel, Rutgers-New Brunswick scientists have developed an extremely efficient “molecular trap” that can be recycled and reused. Read more.

Prof. Bob Kopp, Director of Rutgers Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences (EOAS), is an author of the U.S. Global Change Research Program’s Climate Science Special Report: Fourth National Climate Assessment, Volume I, released November 3 and currently the most up-to-date comprehensive report on climate science in the world.

Prof. Kopp and other authors will participate in a AAAS Facebook Live webinar at 3pm on November 8. The report is currently described in the following:

In the startup ecosystem in New Jersey, not enough founders have heard of the Rutgers EcoComplex, in Bordentown, which is part of the New Jersey Business Incubation Network.

The mission of the EcoComplex is to promote the development of the environmental and alternative energy industries, including the testing and verification of innovations in alternative energy, the remediation and protection of environmental quality, and the promotion of compatible sectors of the food industry and innovative agriculture.

New to the incubator is the EcoIgnite Clean Energy Proof of Concept Center and Accelerator Program, which will be headed by Serpil Guran, director of the EcoComplex, and which received a grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Authority, “which recognized the importance of clean energy business development in the mid-Atlantic Region.” Rutgers has been at the forefront of research and business development in New Jersey in this field. Read more.

jieun yangThe Rutgers Energy Institute (REI) is proud to announce that Jieun Yang is one of this year's Materials Research Society (MRS) Postdoctoral Award recipients.The REI  proudly funded Jieun Yang as a REI research fellow for her work in the Nano-materials and Devices Group under Dr. Manish Chhowalla.  The MRS Postdoctoral Award recognizes postdoctoral scholars who are showing exceptional promise that may include, for example, excellence in scientific research, leadership, advocacy, outreach, or teaching, during their postdoc assignment. 

The award citation is: “for creative research in chemically exfoliated 2D materials and tireless dedication to mentoring women in science and engineering”. The award consists of a $2,000 honorarium, a citation certificate, and complimentary meeting registration to attend the 2017 MRS Fall Meeting. This year’s MRS Postdoctoral Awards,  will be presented during the 2017 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston.

Save a Watt, Save the World

Campus vs. Campus Energy Reduction Competition for 2017

31 days of energy conservation for the month of October. Are you up for the challenge?

Guidelines for Energy Competition

  1. Check out: http://facilities.rutgers.edu/about-ufcp/sustainability/energy-conservation-tips to find out what you can do to save energy on your campus.
  1. University Facilities will collect electrical energy readings for each campus from October 1-31, and compared to October the previous year.
  1. The campus that reduces its energy usage by the greatest percentage wins the energy trophy!
  1. Rankings will be posted after the trophy presentation.

Trophy will be awarded at a home Football game.

Flyer available for posting

Sponsored by:  University Facilities and Capital Planning

 

 

Smart cities— where different utilities and services are interconnected via the Internet of Things(IoT) — may be especially beneficial during times of emergency.

Narayan Mandayam, a Distinguished Professor and Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rutgers University, said by utilizing the IoT to connect different telecommunications platforms and utility services, municipalities can enhance communication between first responders while also handling any potential problems to the water, gas or power services faster.

“A smart city is where every device, every entity and every object can connect wirelessly for whatever the needs,” Mandayam said in a statement. “To make a smart city happen, a tremendous amount of investment in infrastructure will be needed, but the benefits will likely far outweigh the costs. It scares me to think what it would mean for congestion, pollution and quality of life if we don’t start doing things to mitigate them.”

Mandayam, who lives in New Jersey, said he was inspired by what he saw during superstorm Sandy, which devastated the state on Oct. 29, 2012. He said he personally was without power for five days, while others in the state did not have power for at least two weeks. Read more.

The Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering’s Marianthi Ierapetritou was recently advanced to the ranks of distinguished professor—a title reserved for faculty who have achieved “scholarly eminence” in their field, according to the university.

Marianthi Ierapetritou

Ierapetritou has published over 150 papers and received over 50 conference invitations to discuss her research, which focuses on process operations, flexible manufacturing systems, modeling of reactive flow processes, and metabolic engineering. She has served as chair of the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering since 2013.

Among Ierapetritou’s many awards are the prestigious NSF Career Award (2000-2004), NASA’s New Jersey Space Grant Consortium (2000-2001), Rutgers’ Teaching Excellence Award (2002), and the School of Engineering’s Outstanding Faculty Award (2012).

Highly active in the scientific community, Ierapetritou serves as vice president of Computer Aids in Chemical Engineering (CACHE) and vice chair/program coordinator for the Computing and Systems Technology (CAST) division of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE). She is also a member of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS), the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), the Rutgers Energy Institute (REI), and the Engineering Specific Career Advisory Problem-Solving Environment (ESCAPE).

 

Continuing to pave the way in innovation, Rutgers is launching a new program to bridge the gap between the lab and marketplace.

Materials Science and Engineering Professor Dunbar Birnie recently received a $500,000 grant to support Rutgers' inventions for the next five years through the NSF I-Corps program. According to the NSF, the I-Corps program works to bring research projects to the marketplace, thereby fostering a national ecosystem of innovation.

“Our program is aimed very broadly to help Rutgers students and faculty take their innovations and help them move toward commercialization,” said Birnie, whose research interests revolve around solar technology.

Birnie is working in collaboration with the Rutgers Office of Research Commercialization, Rutgers Business School, and Rutgers Entrepreneurship Coalition to nurture Rutgers’ inventions through a Rutgers’ NSF I-Corps Site. 

The NSF has established dozens of I-Corps Sites across the country to provide the infrastructure and resources groups need to prepare their work for commercialization.

“The real impact—we hope—will be in new technologies, new jobs, and where Rutgers will be known as the place where these new technologies arose.”

Rutgers funds over $600 million in research per year, which generates over 150 patents and more than $15 million in licensing income annually. Project leaders hope that the program will help to successfully transition research outcomes to the commercialization stage.

Birnie said that since the program is just getting underway, there are no specific innovations to report yet.

“We are targeting inventive Rutgers students and faculty far and wide,” he said.

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